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Archive for the ‘data loss’ tag

Developing a Data Backup Plan   no comments

Posted at Apr 18, 2017 @ 10:04am turnkey cloud

Is your company prepared for a catastrophe that could result in the loss of your data? You’ve most likely taken out insurance to protect yourself against natural disasters, robberies and similar catastrophic events. Your data should be no different. The only difference is that this type of insurance involves making one or more copies of your information so that it can be accessed if something happens to the original data, whether it’s the result of one of those catastrophic situations mentioned above or it’s something like a hardware failure or a disastrous infection.

 

Onsite Backup

Onsite backup involves you copying your data to a separate or shared drive that is located on the same premises as your primary data source. The most significant benefit of this plan is that you can always have your secondary data right there. If something happens to your primary computer system, it’s normally easy to start utilizing the backup sources, and you don’t need to have an internet connection to do so. The cost of utilizing this type of data backup is usually relatively low, and the process of backing up your data with this method is normally pretty simple.

However, several significant disadvantages exist as well. A natural disaster such as a flood or tornado that destroys your original data will often take out your backup data too if it’s being kept onsite. And if somebody breaks in and steals your primary data, doing the same to your secondary data too can be done on the same trip.

 

Cloud Backup

Those taking advantage of cloud backup options will have their data sent to a remote datacenter on a regular basis. Probably the most significant benefit of going this route is that multiple copies of your data will can be made to stored on multiple servers located in a variety of places. That way if something disastrous happened to one place or server where your backup data was stored, you could simply access an alternate. Your data is safe at these locations as it is encrypted before being stored, and you will generally enjoy unlimited or nearly unlimited storage capacity. Another benefit is being able to automate the process so that you are not dependent on somebody remembering to back up the data.

An indirect benefit of utilizing a cloud backup method is that those who are authorized to do so can easily access the data, whether they are located across town or even on the other side of the world. This is a great benefit for organizations with multiple locations or remote staff.

However, some cons exist with this method. It generally costs a little more to go this route instead of backing up your data onsite, although that is countered by not needing to purchase your own backup equipment. How quickly you can retrieve your data is also going to be very dependent on your office’s internet speed, something that is a non-issue if your data is onsite. You also have to make sure that you research and trust the datacenter provider you are using to back up your data remotely.

 

What to Back Up

Determining what needs to be backed up should be addressed before you look at how you back it up. You can back up everything, otherwise known as a full backup. This obviously requires the most storage space as well as the most time. However, it helps ensure that you will be completely back up and running in a timely manner if some disaster causes your primary data source to no longer be accessible.

However, this is not always necessary. In that case, consider an incremental or partial backup. An incremental backup involves the backing up of only files that had been created or changed since the last time your data had been backed up. This tends to be much quicker, but you do need to then ensure that you have access to several incremental backups in order to fully restore your data. It can also be difficult to organize your files or to find a specific one if you are downloading several incremental backups after disaster struck.

A partial backup means that you are only backing up part of your data, presumably the most valuable portion. However, the difference between a partial backup and a complete backup is usually minimal, meaning that, with a few exceptions, you might as well just back up everything.

 

Organizing Your Backup Plan

Keep some important details of your backup plan in written form. This includes exactly what’s being backed up, when and how often that occurs and who is responsible for ensuring that it occurs at the time it’s supposed to and to the thoroughness that is expected.

Do you want to back up everything that is located on computers at the office? What about data located on laptops or cellphones that are taken to and from home? Is your email or website backed up? Do you want them to be? Do you possess physical forms and documents that you want scanned into electronic form and then backed up in that form so that you are set if something such as a fire or flood destroys the hard copies?

Focus initially on the most important data, whatever would cause the most damage were the information to become inaccessible. These files should also be backed up more often. Of course, it does take time and money to back up your information, but it is well worth it when you consider the repercussions of losing access to it for a considerable time period or forever.

 

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Written by David Maurer on April 18th, 2017

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Best Practices For Protecting Your Data   no comments

Posted at Oct 25, 2016 @ 10:34am backup

Protecting Data

When businesses save files to their hard drive or another storage device, they often feel as though their data will always be available when they need it. That assumption, however, is dangerous and can cause any company to lose their important files. Data corruption, hardware failure and malicious attacks are just a few of the threats that can harm your files, and those who fail to back up their data will be out of luck. Confused and frustrated, these individuals often find out the hard way that they should have taken action.

If you don’t want to repeat the same mistake, then it’s time to take a look at the different ways that you can protect your data from being destroyed. Taking the right steps will give you peace of mind because you will know that your files are not in danger. No matter if you are trying to safeguard family pictures or business contacts, the following information will help you reach your goals.

 

Cloud Backup

When protecting your data is your No. 1 goal, you might feel as though creating a local backup is enough, but it’s not. If all of your files are stored on the same server, then you will still lose everything if that server gets destroyed. The good news is that you can combat this problem by utilizing a Cloud Backup solution. This option involves uploading the data that you want to protect to ‘The Cloud’ – a cluster of servers located in a remote, secure datacenter.

If something happens to your main or local storage server, cloud backups enable you to still have access to the files that you need. Best of all, your data will be available anytime, anywhere, and from nearly any device.

 

Set a Schedule

After learning about the importance of keeping backups, many businesses either dedicate a server to secure their files or rent one. At first, they put in the effort to create backups on a regular basis, but they don’t remain dedicated to the process. As time goes on, they often stop using their backup servers. To avoid that situation, you can determine how often you need to create backups and set a schedule.

When you do so, staying on track will be that much easier. Some people backup their files one time each week, but others do so every night. The number of backups that you want to create will depend on several factors, but the important part is to remain consistent.

 

Set a Retention Limit

Once you have a backup system in place, you want to decide on the amount of time that you will store your data. Many businesses will delete some backups every few months or years, but you might need to keep some records for as long as you can. For example, tax records should be saved for seven years if you don’t want to encounter problems.

Although deciding which files to keep is not always an easy task, prioritizing your data can help. The length of time that you will keep each backup will also depend on the amount of storage space that is available to you. So if your current solutions are not meeting your needs, then it could be time to consider upgrading.

 

Use Encryption

Backing up your data is a smart move, but you also need to protect your files from unauthorized individuals. Criminals try to target servers that have the least amount of protection because they want to access data easily. If you don’t secure your files, then you could become a victim. If you own or manage a business, then you are also putting your customers’ data at risk, which is not acceptable.

When you encrypt your data, you scramble the code in a way that makes it all but impossible to read. Even if someone can obtain your files, they will not be able to do anything with them. Only those authorized with the decryption key will be able to actually view your data.

 

Final Thoughts

Don’t make the mistake of ignoring the threats that can destroy your data. If a business loses its clients’ contact information, then that business could fail. Even if a company can recover from data loss, the fallout could have a lasting impact on its reputation. If customers don’t think that a business takes steps to keep their digital information safe, then they will find a company that does.

As technology continues to improve, you will start to depend on it more and more each day, and the dangers involved with not protecting yourself will only increase. Backing up your data right now could be a choice that saves your business from failure, and you should keep that fact at the front of your mind when you are making your decision.

Looking for the easiest way to protect your data while utilizing all of the best practices mentioned above?  Look no further than TurnKey Internet’s next-generation Cloud Backup solution – TurnKey Vault.  What makes TurnKey Vault the absolute best Cloud Backup solution on the market is our system was built from the ground up with business users in mind. From encryption so strong that even we can’t see your data, to the most advanced features on the market – like Live Cloud Replication, bare metal recovery and the ability to restore a server, PC or even an entire office of computers, live, in real-time, into a fully functional, cloud-based virtual environment accessible from anywhere over the Internet.

TurnKey Vault’s next-generation Cloud Backup technology offers true Business Continuity and peace of mind through cloud-based redundancy that allows you to restore anything, anytime, anywhere. For more information, visit TurnKeyVault.com

 

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Written by David Maurer on October 25th, 2016

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Three Certain things in Life : Death, Taxes, And Data Loss – Make April 15th Your Backup Checkup Day   no comments

Posted at Apr 14, 2015 @ 11:01pm backup

death_taxes_and_data_lossAs Tax day hits here in the United States, the dreaded April 15th, there is the old saying from Benjamin Franklin that there were only two things certain in life, Death and Taxes.  While that remains true, the reality is in this digital age there is one item just as likely as paying taxes this year, you are going to run into some form of data loss this year.  Tax documents are supposed to be saved for 7 years, the reality is you are far more likely to loose that data in the next 7 years than get audited, and you probably want to avoid both like death.

Data loss is a reality, just like taxes – Kroll’s survey about data loss states that 61% lose their data because of an inadequate data protection plan, and less than 33% of companies that had a data loss in the last year were able to recover all of their data! – that can mean no backups, or backups that didn’t do the job to keep your data safe or your business running when you need it most.

Computer servers, office pc’s, online web sites and mobile devices – all are at risk every day from outside threats like hackers and inside threats like careless or malicious employees, and the fact that hardware breaks eventually (certainly when is the last time a hard drive, laptop, or mobile device been around for the 7 years you need to store those tax returns in case of an audit?) makes data loss as inevitable as death and taxes.

Having a backup plan is a good start, there are many pieces of do-it-yourself software out there, tape backups, and even external USB drives you can copy data.   There are even many traditional online cloud backup service providers out there – but these methods just copy some of your data, leaving you often with an inadequate true data backup protection plan to get you back up and running after disaster strikes.

The reason the traditional method of backing up your data or traditional online cloud backup services are still inadequate, and leave over 2/3rds  of companies unable to recover 100% of their data is because when something breaks or is lost –  you still can be offline for days or weeks while you re-install operating systems, your specific software, or try to find the same old operating system files to install on a new server only to find it is not compatible with the new server like you thought.  Then you waste more time trying to restore files that wont work on the newer version of software you had manually re-installed- and you now have spent days and $1000’s on expensive IT consultants to try to pick up the pieces and put it back together from all those well intentioned backup plans.

The next generationg of secure online cloud backup service like TurnKey Vault offer new technology to solve this – with cloud-based replication and complete business continuity in mind.  You remotely backup your data securely over the Internet like traditional cloud based services to a secure remote data vault that encrypts and stores your backups.  Unlike traditional backup services, TurnKey Vault  gives you the option at the push of a button to restore your data like traditional services, or replicate your entire office as cloud-based servers, pc’s and laptops.  TurnKey Vault lets you convert your backups to live fully identical to the original pc’s, laptops, and servers  right into the cloud to be securely accessed remotely over the Internet.  So no more re-installing applications, operating systems or replacing broken hardware in the event disaster – the cloud is easy and fast to access with completely secure copies of your office servers, pc’s and laptops.

So if you want complete peace of mind – make April 15th not only your tax filing date each year but a chance to double check your backup plans are adequate, and if not consider moving to the latest generation of cloud based backup technology to get peace of mind.  While Death and Taxes can’t be avoided, data loss can at least be survivable if you put the right plans in place before its too late.

 

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Written by Adam on April 14th, 2015

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Why Your Business Needs Network Attached Storage   no comments

Posted at Aug 25, 2010 @ 10:42am News

This week, we released a new product called TurnKey Vault NAS (Network Attached Storage). The TurnKey Vault NAS is a cloud-based backup service that can be mounted as a local hard drive on your computer for easy (and extremely secure) drag-and-drop backups. NAS services have been needed for a long time now, especially as businesses have become more and more remote. People need to be able to share files on the go. Since almost all of our data has gone digital, the need for secure backups is greater than it has ever been. Cloud NAS services make file sharing and secure remote backups possible, but they have traditionally been inaccessible to regular business owners who may not know the technical ins and outs of server management. That is why we are so excited to be able to offer a simple, easy-to-use Network Attached Storage service direct to you from the TurnKey Cloud.

TurnKey Vault NAS Features

More and more businesses rely on cloud services every day, but not all cloud services are created equal. TurnKey NAS is universally accessible (via FTP, SCP, SFTP, Rsync, NFS or Samba connections) and cross platform (PC, MAC, Linux and more). TurnKey NAS is also compatible with every backup software package that supports direct-to-disk backups. It’s perfect for secure backups and file sharing.

Protect Your Business from Catastrophic Loss

The biggest fear for every business owner is a complete server meltdown resulting in catastrophic loss. Can your business afford to lose all of your data? Ours can’t. Easy drag-and-drop backups are now possible with TurnKey NAS, and we are advising all of our clients to take advantage of the service. Backing up directly from your desktop is the easiest and fastest way to make consistent copies of the files you use (and update) most. Make backups as you go, as you need them, and never lose another day’s work again.

Share Files From Anywhere

With TurnKey NAS, you and your colleagues can access files on-the-go, from any smart device, from anywhere in the world. Forgot your presentation? No problem. Lost a disk? Just log-in and download. Not only is this a critical service for any business, it is a critical service for you, personally. Save yourself embarrassment, extra work and stress. Streamline your business data, and protect your most valuable business asset: your hard work.

LEARN MORE ABOUT TURNKEY VAULT NAS, AND SIGN UP!!!

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